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Dental

UnitedHealthcare

Bridge2Health

New Study: Oral Health impacts medical claims. Learn More

Integrating dental and medical matters

The facts

  • Members with chronic conditions who are engaged in their oral health have significantly lower medical claims than those who are not.
  • Our program engages the unengaged.

Our dental plans offer an array of benefits that promote oral health. We even offer extra benefits1 that some other carriers may not, including annual oral cancer screenings for all adults and extra visits during pregnancy three months following delivery. On their own, our dental plans provide the coverage needed to keep your employees' smiles healthy. But even greater value comes when you offer your employees a UnitedHealthcare medical and dental plan. The two are simply better together.

We have the data, and we know how to use it!

At UnitedHealthcare, we have a vast amount of data, and we understand how to leverage it to improve health and lower medical claims.

Step 1: We look across your employees' dental and medical claims to identify those with chronic conditions that can be impacted by improved oral health.

Step 2: We then identify those who are not taking the right steps to care for their mouth and reach out to them, reminding them to see a dentist for important services.

Success! When we connect, 50 percent see a dentist within six months.  

Why is that important?

Because employees with chronic conditions drive 75%2 of all medical costs. Impact them, and you'll impact your bottom line.

Where's the proof?

Our proprietary study demonstrates that those with wide range of chronic conditions who are engaged in their oral health have average annual medical claims that are 15% less than those who are not. It's time to engage these members! Learn more.

But it's not just about those with chronic conditions

  • Assigning an activation score to each plan member: We have a plan to improve the oral health of all of your employees. In fact, we evaluate the claims of your entire population, assigning all members  an activation score based on their oral health and whether or not they are receiving the care they need to maintain a healthy mouth. We'll share that information in aggregate with you, so you can see the health of your total population.
  • Launching a companywide educational campaign: Use the handy educational calendar or pick and choose the fliers, videos and blogs that are most relevant to your group. We're available to consult with you to develop an effective oral health education plan.

Resources

Bridge2Health Dental Claims Study
Bridge2Health Dental Claims Executive Summary
Dental Health and Wellness Education Materials


See the Big Picture – oral health impacts overall health

  • Those with diabetes are more likely to have gum disease. Untreated, gum disease can make it difficult for people with diabetes to stabilize their sugar levels. Individuals with diabetes who receive gum disease treatment can see a positive impact on their blood sugar levels.3, 4
  • Pregnant women who maintain good oral health see a positive impact on their health and their baby's health.5, 6
  • Gum disease leads to increased inflammation, which can worsen the complications of kidney disease. Treating gum disease reduces inflammation, which can reduce the risk of kidney failure.7

 

1Offered with most plans, including all PPO plans.
2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/index.htm
3National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, "Periodontal (Gum) Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments," www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm, NIH Publication No. 11-1142, July 2011, no copyright.
4American Academy of Periodontology, "Gum Disease and Diabetes," http://www.perio.org/consumer/mbc.diabetes.htm, last modified February 23, 2011.
5National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, "Periodontal (Gum) Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments,"
www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm, NIH Publication No. 11-1142, July 2011, no copyright.
6Mayo Clinic, "Preeclampsia," mayoclinic.com/health/preeclampsia/DS00583/DSECTION=risk-factors, April 21, 2011.
7Craig, RG, "Interactions between chronic renal disease and periodontal disease," Oral Dis. 2008 Jan;14(1):1-7.