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Stroke - Test Your Knowledge

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Stroke – Test Your Knowledge

Answer "true" or "false" to the following questions. Then check your answers to find out how much you already know about stroke.

1. When a stroke occurs, the blood supply within the brain is interrupted.

True   False

That's right. The brain requires a constant flow of blood to work properly. If the blood flow is disrupted, brain cells do not receive enough oxygen, resulting in cell death. The degree of damage that results from a stroke is dependent on where and how much blood flow to the brain is interrupted.

Sorry. The correct answer is "true." The brain requires a constant flow of blood to work properly. If the blood flow is disrupted, brain cells do not receive enough oxygen, resulting in cell death. The degree of damage that results from a stroke is dependent on where and how much blood flow to the brain is interrupted.

2. Certain factors that cannot be controlled may increase your personal risk of developing a stroke.

True   False

Congratulations! Your answer is right. The following factors may increase your risk of developing a stroke: family history (parent or sibling has had a stroke), age (risk increases with age), gender (men are at increased risk), and race (African-Americans and Hispanics have a greater risk than other races).

Sorry. The correct answer is "true." The following factors may increase your risk of developing a stroke: family history (parent or sibling has had a stroke), age (risk increases with age), gender (men are at increased risk) and race (African-Americans and Hispanics have a greater risk than other races).

3. Lifestyle modifications cannot reduce your personal risk of having a stroke.

True   False

Sorry. Your answer is incorrect. There are several risk factors for developing a stroke that you can control through lifestyle changes. These include controlling your blood pressure, quitting smoking, maintaining a near normal weight, monitoring and reducing cholesterol levels, learning to decrease the amount of stress in your life, monitoring blood sugar levels and controlling diabetes when it is present, getting a moderate amount of exercise each day (20 to 30 minutes), limiting alcohol consumption and getting regular checkups to identify the presence of heart disease.

Congratulations! Your answer is right. There are several risk factors for developing a stroke that you can control through lifestyle changes. These include controlling your blood pressure, quitting smoking, maintaining a near normal weight, monitoring and reducing cholesterol levels, learning to decrease the amount of stress in your life, monitoring blood sugar levels and controlling diabetes when it is present, getting a moderate amount of exercise each day (20 to 30 minutes), limiting alcohol consumption and getting regular checkups to identify the presence of heart disease.

4. Although stroke is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., the risk of dying from a stroke is less than half of what it was 20 years ago.

True   False

Congratulations! Your answer is right. The significant decrease in the death and disability rates associated with stroke are due, in part, to better control of risk factors. Public education efforts have been successful in raising the public\'s awareness about factors that can be controlled to reduce the risk of stroke. Treatment for stroke has changed during the past 20 years, allowing for earlier medical intervention that can help to reduce the disabling effects of stroke.

Sorry. The correct answer is "true." The significant decrease in the death and disability rates associated with stroke are due, in part, to better control of risk factors. Public education efforts have been successful in raising the public\'s awareness about factors that can be controlled to reduce the risk of stroke. Treatment for stroke has changed during the past 20 years, allowing for earlier medical intervention that can help to reduce the disabling effects of stroke.

5. If you experience warning signs of a stroke that seem vague or that disappear, you don't need to be alarmed about their seriousness.

True   False

Sorry. The right answer is "false." Although the symptoms associated with strokes are sometimes painless and subtle, they always require immediate medical attention. The most common warning signs of a stroke include sudden numbness, weakness or paralysis, often occurring on one side of the body, difficulties with speech, changes in vision, dizziness and difficulty walking, unexplained headache, or trouble swallowing.

Congratulations! Your answer is right. Although the symptoms associated with strokes are sometimes painless and subtle, they always require immediate medical attention. The most common warning signs of a stroke include sudden numbness, weakness or paralysis, often occurring on one side of the body, difficulties with speech, changes in vision, dizziness and difficulty walking, unexplained headache, or trouble swallowing.

6. The longer a stroke goes untreated, the greater the risk of permanent disability.

True   False

Congratulations! You answered correctly. Every minute counts when treating a stroke. The sooner that medical care is initiated, the better the chances of reducing the ill effects associated with stroke. Treatment for stroke that is aimed at limiting brain damage must begin within hours after symptoms first appear.

Sorry! The correct answer is "true." Every minute counts when treating a stroke. The sooner that medical care is initiated, the better the chances of reducing the ill effects associated with stroke. Treatment for stroke that is aimed at limiting brain damage must begin within hours after symptoms first appear.

7. Stroke is a disorder that affects only the elderly.

True   False

Sorry! The correct answer is "false." Although strokes are more common among the elderly (two-thirds of strokes occur in people over age 65), they can affect people of all ages. There are two main categories of stroke: ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic strokes are due to an obstruction of blood flow in the brain that is often the result of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when an artery in the brain ruptures and blood leaks out of it, placing pressure on surrounding brain tissue.

Congratulations! You answered correctly. Although strokes are more common among the elderly (two-thirds of strokes occur in people over age 65), they can affect people of all ages. There are two main categories of stroke: ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic strokes are due to an obstruction of blood flow in the brain that is often the result of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when an artery in the brain ruptures and blood leaks out of it, placing pressure on surrounding brain tissue.

8. A TIA or a mini-stroke is a temporary interruption in blood flow to the brain that may present with symptoms that are similar to those of a full-blown stroke.

True   False

Congratulations! You answered correctly. The symptoms of a TIA, or mini-stroke, are similar to those of a stroke, except that in a TIA the symptoms resolve after a few minutes or several hours. A TIA is a warning that a serious problem exists, and it is imperative that these symptoms not be ignored. Studies show that up to one-third of people suffering a stroke have had a previous TIA. Seeking quick medical attention if and when a TIA occurs could greatly reduce your risk of having a full-blown stroke later on.

Sorry! The correct answer is "true." The symptoms of a TIA, or mini-stroke, are similar to those of a stroke, except that in a TIA the symptoms resolve after a few minutes or several hours. A TIA is a warning that a serious problem exists, and it is imperative that these symptoms not be ignored. Studies show that up to one-third of people suffering a stroke have had a previous TIA. Seeking quick medical attention if and when a TIA occurs could greatly reduce your risk of having a full-blown stroke later on.

9. Any damage or paralysis that results following a stroke will be permanent.

True   False

Sorry! Your answer is incorrect. The physical disabilities that result from a stroke may be temporary or permanent depending on many factors. The factors include the type of stroke, which brain cells have been damaged, how well the body repairs the blood supply to the brain and how quickly other regions of the brain can take over the workload of the affected areas. Often times, people who suffer a stroke undergo a process of rehabilitation that is aimed at getting back as many prior functions as possible.

That's right. The physical disabilities that result from a stroke may be temporary or permanent depending on many factors. The factors include the type of stroke, which brain cells have been damaged, how well the body repairs the blood supply to the brain and how quickly other regions of the brain can take over the workload of the affected areas. Often times, people who suffer a stroke undergo a process of rehabilitation that is aimed at getting back as many prior functions as possible.

10. Each section or hemisphere of the brain controls the movement and sensation on the opposite side of the body.

True   False

Congratulations! You answered correctly. Different parts of the brain are responsible for different bodily functions. When a stroke occurs on the left side of the brain, it affects the right side of the body. And when it occurs on the right side of the brain, it affects the left side of the body. The left side of the brain also controls speech, so a stroke to this part of the brain may result in slurred or distorted speech.

Sorry. The correct answer is "true." Different parts of the brain are responsible for different bodily functions. When a stroke occurs on the left side of the brain, it affects the right side of the body. And when it occurs on the right side of the brain, it affects the left side of the body. The left side of the brain also controls speech, so a stroke to this part of the brain may result in slurred or distorted speech.


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